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Bush fire prone land

Bush fire prone land (BFPL) is land that has been identified by local council which can support a bush fire or is subject to bush fire attack. Bush fire prone land maps are prepared by local council and certified by the Commissioner of the NSW RFS.

Why do I need to consider bush fire prone land?

You may live near bush fire prone land which means your home may be surrounded by bush, you may live near grassland, paddocks or near the coast. The NSW RFS as part of its fire management strategies have strengthened the rules around how and where you can build your home so that you can still enjoy the landscape but keep you and your home safe. If you live in BFPL you should have a bush fire survival plan.

Where do I find out if my land is bush fire prone or not?

Example Bush Fire Prone Land Map You can check our online tool or contact your local council and ask to view the bush fire prone land map. The information should also be noted on the Section 149 Certificate for the property (obtained from your local council). It is council’s responsibility to review their bush fire prone land map at regular intervals. Councils can make amendments to the bush fire prone land map at any time and are submitted to the NSW RFS for certification.

On the right is an example of a bush fire prone land map available from your local council. Any areas coloured yellow, red or orange on a bush fire prone land map are considered to be bush fire prone.

What do I need to consider if I want to build on bush fire prone land?

You as the home owner and/or your building designer should obtain all relevant information relating to the property before designing a new home, altering or adding to an existing home. Planning for Bush Fire Protection requires certain protective measures be met in order to make a building less likely to suffer damage or destruction from bush fires. It is not the intention of the measures to prevent the development of land in bush fire prone areas however, in order to provide adequate protection from bush fires, it may be necessary to modify the style, construction material or sighting of a building.

Where do I go for more information on building in a bush fire prone area?

You can contact your local council (via phone, in person or visiting their website), visit our building in a bush fire area section or contact a bush fire consultant (for more information see Fire Protection Association Australia, Bush Fire Planning and Design (BPAD) Accredited Practitioners.

The NSW RFS has published a guide for bush fire prone land mapping which provides the details for the mapping of bush fire prone land as required under section 146 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979. It is for use by local councils, those involved in the mapping of urban release areas and the NSW RFS.